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Friday, June 13, 2014

Peritoneal Dialysis Frequently Asked Questions Part 1

This is Peritoneal Dialysis Frequently Asked Questions Part 1
Click here for Part 1
Click here for Part 2
Click here for Part 3
Click here for Part 4

When I see patients in PD clinic, I encounter similar questions. This page should answer many commonly asked questions regarding peritoneal dialysis in different languages. If you have any other questions, please write it on this blog post, and I will try to answer them to the best of my ability.

1. How often will I have to come in for check ups?
Most dialysis centers would like to see their patients at least once a month unless your doctor or nurse instruct you otherwise. If you are not sure, call you PD nurse. There should be a 24 hour nurse available to answer questions. Remember, on each visit, the doctor will go over you lab results and try to optimize your dialysis. Studies show, patients who have good followup with their dialysis team, have good compliance and better outcomes.

2. Do I need a special place to do my dialysis?
One of the most important issues with PD is the setup. Another words, if you dedicate a special place for PD machine and have all the materials ready in one place, it should make it easier for you to connect yourself to the PD machine. Hand hygiene is very important. In addition, the room that you choose to do your dialysis in should be clean and free of clutter, have good lighting and have enough room for all the dialysis supplies.

3. How long will I need to undergo this therapy?
This is a very good question. If you are asking this question, it means you want to get better as soon as possible. With advanced kidney disease, dialysis or kidney transplant is a lifelong therapy. That being said, keep in mind that with other organ failures, such as heart failure and liver failure, there is no such therapy like dialysis to keep patient alive and functioning. In addition, if you have good follow up with your dialysis team and otherwise in good health, you should be referred to a transplant center as soon as possible. Remember, ask around from family members, relatives, friends, and church members to see if they are willing to donate their kidneys. Do NOT be shy. Do NOT be ashamed. Being on dialysis is not your fault. A lot of people would love to be part of such a good act and make a difference.

This is Peritoneal Dialysis Frequently Asked Questions Part 1
Click here for Part 1
Click here for Part 2
Click here for Part 3
Click here for Part 4



Ardavan Mashhadian D.O.
Nephrologist
1400 S Grand Ave Suite 615, Los Angeles, CA 90015
(213) 537-0328

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